Aydin Büyüktaş Challenges Perception With Distorted Views of American Landscapes

For his series Flatland II, Turkish artist Aydin Büyüktaş has created dizzying and distorted views of American landscapes. It took the photographer two months to scout and plan for the locations, then another month and 10,000 miles of travelling across the USA to capture the shots. Aydin captured 18-20 images for each shot, then stitched them together to create collages that stretch into the sky and fold onto themselves.

Rhino Approaches Wildlife Photographer For A Belly Rub

Here’s a cute and surprisingly adorable video of cameraman Garth De Bruno Austin being approached by a wild rhino, requesting a belly rub. A wild animal approaching a human is quite surprising, and if the animal happens to be a rhino things aren’t quite likely to end on a happy note like this one. As Austin pointed out, he has filmed this rhino for a few years and has developed a level of trust.

Photographer With Sleep Disorder Recreates His Nightmares in Photos For The World to See

We may call these photographs terrifying, scary nightmares. For photographer Nicolas Bruno though, these are much more beyond just words. These are the terrors the 22 year-old photographer actually deals with. Nicolas Bruno suffers from sleep paralysis. As he enters the state of REM sleep, he ends up awake, but paralyzed.

Improbability: Well thought, but utterly useless objects

Images and art by Italian photographer Giuseppe Colarusso are quite tantalizing, sometimes creating a surreal world, and often playing with the idea of something that’s possible, but really improbable. Starting off on the path of creativity and off the usual, Giuseppe got his first photograph by creating a pinhole camera out of a shoebox. He used a photographic paper at the bottom of the box and a hole at the center of the lid to get the camera into action.

Ah! What a nice, plaid group of humans

Chinese photographer Zhang Bojun has a nice collection of plaid designs in his portfolio. These “designs” are digital manipulations created from overhead images from the vast sea of humans that are Beijing’s streets. The artist photographs the swarms of people that throng the streets of Beijing and repeats observed patterns, while reducing the actual image to a bird’s eye view. These images take the form of interlocking designs that are usually seen in plaid fabric.