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“Epic” is not a word we throw around often, but it’s one that simply falls when we see the work and renderings of Vil Tsimenzin (Simon Williamson). The renderings are so well done that you can’t help loving the execution. What we are looking at here, is the science fiction series where the designer envisions a series of objects, gadgets and accessories for the future. The set includes gear, an intergalactic probe, and a very Matrix-like helmet.

BBig probe is an interplanetary vehicle loaded with probes and with a job to sample through the atmospheres and properties of celestial bodies it runs into. A fleet of such probes could be put to work, looking for suitable paths and stops, while marking out others that may be toxic or otherwise unsuitable. It can be a vehicle that seats two, a smaller single version, or in a very basic form can be scaled to be carried as a backpack.

The helmet is a very interesting object, mainly because it makes us see things in a different light. Not only because we find Matrix-like similarities in it, but also because of the underlying commentary. It is a gadget of thought and action, providing the wearer with absolute answers, skill and knowledge. While the gadget provides the wearer with absolute answers and quick learning, it does also remove personality and individuality.

Vil, a veteran in design uses the set for a very hard hitting message as well. In his words,

Each injector [of the helmet] is a source of an absolute answer, with no doubts, and certainly controls the source of incredible necessities in terms of a perfect system. Personality and individuality of thought is for the most part a vague notion partitioned and blocked from effectual interference in order to allow for a faster stream of intensely crammed mediocrity of contemplation.

Many additional tools can be integrated into the system. These might include visual and auditory modifiers in coincidence with an enhanced verbal communication component.

This series of images is a comment on the peculiar plight of the modern creative. Learning to think apparently takes too long to accomplish through valid experience; cubic building blocks with singular signature appeal is all there is to play with at this point.


[Thanks, Vil]

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