Paper sculptures by Calvin Nicholls

Canadian artist Calvin Nicholls makes use of sheets of paper to create these amazing sculptures. According to the description on the artist’s Behance page, “Calvin has been creating his paper sculptures since 1986 from his studio north of Toronto Ontario, Canada. Working with sheets of paper and a scalpel, he cuts the component pieces to fit the final drawing and assembles the low relief artwork under studio lighting. When the sculpture is complete the lighting is adjusted to bring out the subtle form and texture. A large format camera is used to capture the detail on 8×10 film prior to scanning for print applications or art prints.”

Pictures captured so artfully, they look like paintings

Looking incredibly like paintings, these works happen to be photographs captured by Barbara Cole. The photographer made use of the SX-70 camera along with carefully arranged studio lighting and some imaginative manipulations to capture these images, making them look incredibly like photographs. These series of photographs came to an end with the end of Polaroid, the company, its camera and the film.

Beautiful lamps crafted from re-purposed materials

There is an inherent beauty in the Steampunk-ish old timey lamps from artist Cory Barkman. He has just sent us images of the latest batch of lamps. Like their predecessors, these lamps are made mostly from repurposed materials. Cory starts off work with a design and idea, foraging for exact parts that would blend, work well with the lamps. If the artist is unable to find parts for the meticulously designed lamps, he gets to work forging them by himself.

Papercraft Leica can capture images

You know the dedication of a camera to take images, when it captures pics even when made out of paper. Going into hyperboles aside, this papercraft Leica sets an impressive stance by managing to capture images, even while it is made of paper. Matthew Nicholson‘s papercraft Leica uses film to capture images, and has most of its working managed by paper, which if you ask us for a levelheaded comment, is totally freakin’ awesome.

Via Gizmodo, technabob

Implanted Nature: 50 tiny art ecosystems for Madrid city

Latest urban art intervention by Luzinterruptus created 50 small ecosystems that are “living in the harshest and greyest areas of Madrid city center.” Miffed at the lack of usable green spaces in Madrid, Luzinterruptus created these tiny installations as a symbolic intervention. These small greenhouses were protected from pollution by umbrella-like tops and the greenery within was accompanied by a flock of animals. Each of these “ecosystems” had its own lights to add to their presentation.

How closely do you resemble the photograph in your passport?

Project Passport and Reality brings to light something we have rarely thought of, the difference between the looks of the person in the passport, and our own appearance. Artists took a look at images in valid passports and put them along with photographs of the passport holders. Intriguing examples, and quite surprisingly true for most of us.

Miniature guns have all the details, except the bullets

Do not let the detailing fool you, these guns are miniatures that won’t shoot. Made in Russia in the ’70s, the artist kept special note of the accuracy, making these weapons from schematics and description of real guns. They are so detailed that they probably could shoot a bullet, if you could somehow find a way to get a tiny bullet to get into these guns.